Tag Archives: Primary science

Focus on feathers

Collect moulted feather for identification or simply for their varied beauty
Collect moulted feathers for identification or simply for their varied beauty

Feathers are unique to birds. Strong, yet light and flexible, a single feather is a thing of great beauty. From July until late summer is a good time to look for feathers when adult birds are moulting: a process of shedding old feathers and growing new ones. Not surprisingly many birds are looking a bit shabby after the efforts raising their young, and are now growing new, strong, warm feathers for the winter. Look for moulted feathers on the ground and try out these activity ideas. Continue reading Focus on feathers

Hedgehog Hogitats

'Merlin' - a rescued hedgehog checking out a hogitat house
‘Merlin’ – a rescued hedgehog checking out a hogitat house

Hedgehogs are one of our most iconic British mammals and the worrying decline in numbers could mean that these snuffling spiny hogs might become a rare sight in the future. The plight of our hedgehogs and how people can help is an excellent study to introduce to children the concept of wildlife conservation and hands-on investigations about hedgehogs and their habitats. Read on for ideas to help plan your hedgehoggy investigation: Continue reading Hedgehog Hogitats

Minibeasts and bughunting

'Bug-napping' - making a pitfall trap
‘Bug-napping’ – making a pitfall trap

 

Learning to observe and record wildlife is a vital for understanding the natural world and conservation. Wildlife is all around us so it’s important to focus, to start with, on one group of animals or plants, and on a local patch – a garden, school grounds or woodland. For beginner groups invertebrates or ‘minibeasts’ offer many opportunities for study: whether they crawl, creep or buzz they hold endless fascination particularly for young observers. Follow these fieldcraft tips to help develop young enquiring minds. Continue reading Minibeasts and bughunting

Surviving the seasons in stages

A slightly weathered Red Admiral butterfly newly woken from its winter sleep
A slightly weathered Red Admiral butterfly newly awoken from its winter sleep

March is the first month that many of us will spot the colourful flutter of butterfly wings heralding that spring has finally sprung. But their reappearance begs the question – where have they been all winter?

Continue reading Surviving the seasons in stages