All posts by Wild Heritage

We offer learning services to schools, groups, attractions and organisations. We specialise in curriculum-linked education using school grounds for discovery, encouraging a whole-school approach to get the most from the outdoors. We also offer consultancy in site management, recreation, visitor experience and interpretation. Our portfolio includes planning self-led trails, developing family activities, delivering events and workshops and much more.

Fledgling birds

An unwary blackbird chick will need to be fed by its parents for several days after leaving the nest

Whilst many baby birds are only now eagerly poking their heads out of nests, some parent birds are already encouraging reluctant youngsters to leave the safety of the nest. Most of our common woodland and garden birds such as robins, blackbirds, starlings and blue tits are feeding their hungry fledglings and May is a good time to observe fat fluffy chicks taking their first ‘hop and flap’ into the wider world. Here are some activities to learn about the marvels of nest building, eggs and baby birds. Continue reading Fledgling birds

Welcome signs of spring

A late winter visitor - a waxwing
                       A late winter visitor – a waxwing

At this time of year the weather is often unpredictable with frost and flurries of snow, heavy rain and flooding mixed with warm, sunny days that reminds us that spring is almost here. Wildlife also reflect this ‘in-between-the-seasons’ character with winter visitors from Scandinavia such as waxwings feeding on the last of the autumns berries at the same time as the drumming of woodpeckers establishing their breeding territories can be heard. Here are some activity ideas to help reawaken your senses and look for those cheerful first signs of spring. Continue reading Welcome signs of spring

A Woodland Invitation

Spot the treecreeper
                                         Spot the treecreeper

January is a quiet month after all the New Year festivities and in terms of wildlife it feels a bit bleak, with trees stripped bare of leaves and many animals in hibernation, the woods seem to be in a deep slumber.

Not surprisingly, January is a month associated with deep reflection as we look back at the year departed and look forward with new hopes. In Greek mythology Janus, for which January is named, is the god of beginnings, transitions and endings. Janus is depicted as having two faces, to look at the future and to the past. We also need time to stop and reflect, and nature can provide the perfect medium to do this. Read on for some ‘woodland therapy’ ideas. Continue reading A Woodland Invitation

Discover the New Forest – ‘We’re going on a cone hunt’

Cones in hand: Douglas fir, Western hemlock, Coast redwood
Cones: Douglas fir, Western hemlock, Coast redwood

Cones make a beautiful addition to Christmas wreathes and decorations but often go unnoticed, hanging high in trees, out of reach until they fall to the ground.  Commonly called pine cones, there are in fact many kinds of cones that grow on different cone bearing trees called conifers. A short walk along the Tall Trees Trail in the New Forest is a wonderful way to experience and learn about some very spectacular conifer trees and their unique cone designs. Read on to begin your cone hunt challenge. Continue reading Discover the New Forest – ‘We’re going on a cone hunt’

Winter Trees

Trees in winter - discover an upside down world
             Trees in winter – discover an upside-down world

The New Forest’s woodlands become different places in the winter. Leaves fall from deciduous trees, in a myriad of autumn colours, to reveal bare branches and twigs with pointy buds. Suddenly leafless, this is the best time to study the shapes and silhouettes of trees; the ancient oaks look bent and wrinkled whilst silver birch look slender and smooth. Here are some fun ideas to help ID and learn about trees in winter: Continue reading Winter Trees

Animal tracks and signs

Deer slot tracks
                                             Deer slot tracks

It’s been a wonderful season for wild food foraging. Harvesting reminds us that we are part of nature and the importance of taking only what you need. Many animals are also busy collecting and eating this bounty of autumn foods to prepare for the winter ahead. As many mammals are nocturnal or very secretive now is a good time to look for feeding signs and animals tracks to see what’s about. Read on for ideas and how to improve your detecting skills: Continue reading Animal tracks and signs

Nature inspired autumn land art

Where does a Leaf Cat go when the wind blows? Don't forget to take a photo of your land art
Where does a Leaf Cat go when the wind blows? Don’t forget to take a photo of your land art.

Autumn is my favourite time of the year to be outdoors exploring the New Forest; foraging for juicy blackberries, collecting fallen crab apples and enjoying the season’s changing colours. It’s also a wonderful time to create some amazing land art – all you need are leaves and a creative imagination. Continue reading Nature inspired autumn land art